Matthew Lane & Associates, P.A.
Palm Beach Gardens, West Palm Beach And Wellington, Florida Offices 561-328-1095

Florida Alimony Reform 2015

Florida Alimony Reform 2015 legislation is explained in this blog. At the present time, alimony reform legislation is moving through the Florida House and the Florida Senate. The latest revisions to the Florida Senate bill create alimony guidelines. The new legislation creates presumptive ranges for the amount and duration of alimony that a Court may award.

The low end of the presumptive amount that the Court may award is calculated by using this formula: 1.5% x the years of marriage x the difference between the monthly gross incomes of the parties. The high end of the presumptive amount that the Court may award is calculated by using this formula: 2% x the years of marriage x the difference between the monthly gross incomes of the parties.

The low end of the presumptive duration that the Court may award is calculated by using this formula: 25% x the years of marriage. The high end of the presumptive duration that the Court may award is calculated by using this formula: 75% x the years of marriage.

In determining the amount and the duration of the alimony, the court is directed to utilize the following factors:

1. The financial resources of the recipient spouse and the ability of the parties to meet his or her reasonable needs independently.

2. The financial resources of the paying spouse and the ability of the paying spouse to meet his or her reasonable needs while paying alimony.

3. The standard of living of the parties during the marriage.

4. The equitable distribution of parties' assets, including whether an unequal distribution of marital assets was made to reduce or alleviate the need for alimony.

5. Both parties' income, employment, and employability, and any necessary reduction in employment due to the need to take care of a child.

6. Whether a party could become better able to support himself or herself and reduce the need for alimony by pursuing additional educational.

7. Whether a party has historically earned higher or lower income than the income reflected at the time of trial.

8. Whether either party has foregone or postponed educational or employment opportunities.

9. Whether either party has caused the depletion or dissipation of marital assets.

10. The amount of temporary alimony.

11. The age, health, and physical and mental condition of the parties.

12. Significant economic or noneconomic contributions to the marriage.

13. The tax consequence of the alimony award.

14. Any other factor necessary to bring about a just result.

To speak with a Florida alimony attorney, contact Matthew Lane & Associates, P.A. at (561) 651-7273. 

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